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Interview with ‘Blade Runner 2022’ Animator Bahi JD

October 30, 2017 6:00pm
by Lachlan Johnston

When it comes to interviews I’ve been dying to bring to life since the very conception of OTAQUEST, formally exchanging words with rapidly-rising animator Bahi JD was definitely somewhere near the top. There’s not a single day that passes that I don’t learn something new about the Austria-born creative, and having the chance to further develop on everything I had already discovered was something I couldn’t help but desire. If you don’t quite know his name yet, I can only hope that changes soon.

With an entire catalogue of work that can be found in series such as “One-Punch Man,” “Space Dandy,” the more recent “Blade Runner Black Out 2022,” and an ever-developing list of different titles, he’s a powerhouse force that won’t be disappearing any time soon.

There’s a lot of different reasons to appreciate his work as a creative — from his self-made position in the industry, to his persistence in everything he does, Bahi JD wins us over in every regard. That’s why we’re so excited to bring you this interview with Bahi JD, which can be found in full below:

It’s a pleasure to speak to you today Bahi JD, before we get too into things, can you give us a brief introduction?

My name is Bahi JD and I’m an animator from Austria who is currently working in the Japanese animation industry. You’ll sometimes see me working in the field of illustration too. 

Can you tell us a little bit about how you got into animation, as well as the steps you took to break into the Japanese animation industry?

I’ve always been fascinated by the world of animation; as early as my school years, I’d constantly be scribbling in my textbooks to create small flipbook-style animations. Perhaps the point where I found myself completely captivated by the world of animation, however, was when I discovered the animators behind some of my favorite titles. Classics such as “Princess Mononoke,” “Akira,” Mamoru Oshii’s “Ghost in the Shell,” “The Iron Giant,” “FLCL,” and a long-list of others had an extremely strong impact on me.

The discovery of these animators eventually lead me to an article about an animator called Ryo-Chimo who utilized an unfamiliar tool to me at the time — the digital-drawing tablet. Ryo-Chimo was especially noteworthy due to his online-postings of his works, and his eventual breakthrough into the animation industry. It was after this I decided to pick up my own digital-drawing tablet, and began practicing animation for fun. It was at this time that I also got in contact with other animators through the internet to ask for their advice — animators such as Cindy Yamauchi, Keisuke Kojima, and Majiro are the first to come to mind. 

I made some gif-animations and sent them to anime producers, but it just wasn’t enough to land me a job. I was undeniably rejected quite a few times. 

Cindy Yamauchi gave me some particularly good advice on the aspects I would need to improve and further develop. It’s not just about being a good animator, it’s also about having strong and flexible drawing skills. You have to show you can draw anything in any style, and you need to be capable of drawing good layouts, which is perhaps one of the most important aspects. During this time I had no idea what “layouts” were, so I picked up and studied a book called “Studio Ghibli Layout Designs.” 

I kept working on my portfolio and would send it back and forward with Cindy Yamauchi, who at the time, was working on a new TV series. She showed my works to the director and producer of the company, and eventually I was hired to work on Shinichiro Watanabe’s “Kids on the Slope.” It was at the same time that director Takuya Hosogane approached me to animate for his Vocaloid music video alongside Shingo Yamashita and Ryo-Chimo. 

In those early days, there was a lot of trial and error involved for me, but the director, producer and animators were very supportive. It was during my learning process that they taught me a lot of different aspects of anime production, and it’s for that I'm very thankful.


You mentioned a few before, but what were some of the animated series you grew up on? Was there much of an anime scene in Austria, or did you have to discover it all on your own?

When I was a child, I grew up watching various Nippon Animation productions such as “Peter Pan no Bouken” and “Heidi.” Later on in my teenage years, however, I would go on to discover “Akira,” “FLCL,” “Ghost in the Shell,” as well as a number of Studio Ghibli films, all of which influenced me. I also enjoyed the animation within works such as “Gurren Lagann,” “Dennou Coil,” “Cowboy Bebop,” and held “Samurai Champloo” in particularly high regard, especially due to it’s incredible soundtrack by Nujabes and Tsuchie.

There was, and still is a strong anime scene in Austria and Germany — TV channels used to broadcast a lot of anime back then. I include Germany as well because a lot of our TV channels were actually the same; even MTV Germany used to broadcast anime. 

With all that being said, there was still a lot of anime that didn’t make it to the television. Those are the series that I discovered through both my friends and the internet. I think with the internet, there’s even more of an anime scene all over the world now. 

Jumping forward quite a bit, you most recently worked on the Watanabe Shinichiro-directed “Blade Runner Black Out 2022” anime short. Can you tell us a little bit about your work on that?

Being both a fan of “Blade Runner” and Watanabe Shinichiro’s works, I was definitely excited to work on the short. We had an entire meeting at Cygames Pictures where Shinichiro Watanabe showed me the storyboard, and we discussed which scene I’d like to work on. I animated the scene where both Trixie and Iggy are fighting the guards. The scene was split into two parts; the first part was animated by the legendary Hiroyuki Okiura, and the second part was my own work. 

It was a great pleasure to work with Shinichiro Watanabe and his team. The character designer Shukou Murase is one of my absolute favorite character-designers. The soundtrack by Flying Lotus was also really great, he captured the atmosphere of “Blade Runner” meticulously, all while adding his own touch to it. 

In your work on the animated project, there’s a mix of fluid motions and dramatic reaction. Can you describe how you went about planning this scene?

Shinichiro Watanabe had a rough storyboard for my action scene, though since it was a rough storyboard, I had a lot of room for new ideas. He allowed me to change up both the action and choreography, as long as it followed the continuity of the other cuts and worked well. You’re always able to try new things during layout and show it to the director for approval. 

The choreography was a real challenge for me, I hadn’t animated any scenes where a single character is pitted against a lot of others before this. I ended up researching a whole bunch of martial arts videos as preparation for the choreography. 

When characters are fighting, you try not to make your choreography look “choreographed.” Making it look natural, that’s always the main challenge. I wanted the audience to be able to follow the action without issue — when there’s a lot of characters on screen it can become hard to follow during fight scenes. I started very roughly with the drawings, almost like a storyboard while planning the action.

Regarding the question about fluid motion and dramatic reaction, to give an example; when Trixie jumps for a kick, I slow down the action to allow time for the motion of the leg to build up energy — in animation, we call this “anticipation.” This way when it snaps super fast, you have the reaction. You can tweak these actions by experimenting with both the “timing” and “spacing” of slow and fast motion. 


When working on the “Blade Runner” project, you had some big-name individuals working alongside you. Was there anyone in particular who really impressed you with their talent during the creation of the short?

I was honestly impressed by everyone’s work on the short film. Especially the cuts by Hiroyuki Okiura, Shinji Hashimoto, Shinya Ohira, Tatsuyuki Tanaka, and Mitsuo Iso.

Every time Hiroyuki Okiura finished a cut, I would ask the producer to let me take a look at it. I’d sit there for an entire hour just staring at each and every frame — his work is absolutely brilliant, and extremely educative. His sense for realism is incredible, and it’s totally his own imagination and skills. He doesn’t use any reference, so when you look at it, you can truly learn the technical work of a master. 

It was also nice to have Tatsuyuki Tanaka on the project. More recently, Tatsuyuki Tanaka’s mostly been active as a director, illustrator, and character designer. As a fan of his work, I was definitely excited to see his key-animation again. He’s a very strong animator, and also worked on “Akira” when he was only 22 or 23. 

In a previous interview you conducted, you mentioned you consider Shinya Ohira to be one of the greatest animators. What do you think of his work on “Blade Runner,” and did you get the chance to talk to him?

Shinya Ohira is someone with the ability to be both stylistic and realistic at the same time. He has extremely high technical skills, and a great artistic vision. On top of that, he manages to balance those two traits well. His work is emotional, expressive, and dynamic. His scene in “Blade Runner” is a flashback to the past, where I felt he captured the feeling of that “memory” very well with the rough artstyle and animation. 

I met him one time at Comiket at an animator booth with Yoshimichi Kameda and others. At Comiket, there’s a lot of different animator booths, and you can find sketchbooks, art books, and flipbooks by a number of great animators such as Mitsuo Iso, Shinya Ohira, and Yutaka Nakamura. I recommend checking out the animator booths if you ever go to Comiket, the art books are great.

From the very beginning with “Kids on the Slope,” then “Space Dandy,” and now “Blade Runner,” what is it about Shinichiro Watanabe as a director that keeps calling you back?

I’m more than happy a great director like him continues to work with me. It’s always a pleasure, and I learn a lot each time I work with him. He also allows me to be very expressive when working on his projects.

It’d be fair to say that none of the anime projects you’ve worked on have been “ordinary.” Series such as “One-Punch Man,” and “Ping Pong” immediately spring to mind, but what is it that draws you to these out of the ordinary series’?

I’m just a fan of the projects, and of the people who end up working on them. I like to work on projects where I can learn a lot as an animator from the team members. These kinds of projects can be very challenging, so it’s always exciting and interesting.

Where do you see the anime industry 10 years from now?

That’s a hard question. I’ve not been in the industry for a very long time, but in the time that I have been here, I’ve seen much improvement over the years. I see a good future for the anime industry, and things are improving step by step.

Young animators in the industry are very passionate and are improving every single day, so I think there’s going to be a new wave of big-name animators in the future. More generally, the people here work with strong passion and enthusiasm. They love to animate together, and it’s this strong passion for animation amongst these young creators that gives me hope we’re heading towards a promising future.

Working as a foreigner in the Japanese animation industry, is there any advice you’d give to others looking at following in your footsteps?

Learn the Japanese language, communication is very important. There are English speakers in the anime industry, but they aren’t always going to be there when you need to communicate with everybody.

Finally, is there anything you’d like to say to those following your works?

Thank you for all of your support, and thanks for appreciating animation! 

Jumping over numerous hurdles presented by the industry, Bahi JD is a name we’re certain to see for years to come. He’s a creator with clear inspiration, but also someone unafraid of paving his own paths — and we can’t wait to see where he goes next. If you’re interested in checking out more of his works, you can find him on both Twitter and Tumblr where he frequently shares what he’s working on, as well as sharing glimpses into the life of an animator.

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Nintendo Celebrates Over 1,000 Games on Switch

November 15, 2018 6:00pm
by Lachlan Johnston

Only two years into its lifecycle and Nintendo is already celebrating the release of over 1,000 games on the Nintendo Switch. That's no small feat, especially given the Wii U failed to even reach the four-digit mark within its entire lifespan. But with that being said, what are all these games, and just how did Nintendo come to the conclusion that they had achieved that milestone? While it certainly doesn't answer that overarching question, Nintendo UK did release a celebratory video to highlight just a portion of the games that made it possible.
 


Opening to the tune of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, the trailer quickly directs viewers attention towards a slew of other in-house and AAA titles for the Nintendo Switch. All in all, however, we only see a total of 12 games showcased in this trailer -- 11 if you don't count Pokémon: Let's Go! as two games -- so that only further begs to ask, just what are the other 9,988 titles? Well, it would turn out its a lot of different titles, including over eight games that feature the word "Mario" in their title. 

It's a lot of indie titles, it's a lot of AAA action, and it's probably a sizeable amount of fun overall. Whatever it is, the Nintendo Switch actually has a decently sized library -- though I'm not gonna go and vouch for all of the games in that library. While the number of titles on the console sits around the 1,200 mark, it's quite quickly catching up to the likes of Sony's PlayStation 4 which holds around 1,800 titles, as well as Microsoft's Xbox One at 1,700 titles. 

I probably couldn't name more than 30 titles on the Nintendo Switch, but them keeping track of over 1,000 is definitely an impressive feat, and one that the company should probably give themselves a pat on the back for. We're sure we'll be seeing that number increase over these next couple of years too, so until then, we'll be sure to keep you up-to-date on all (maybe not all) the latest releases, as they happen.

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David Productions to Helm Adaptation of ‘Soul Eater’ Creator’s ‘Fire Force’

November 15, 2018 4:00pm
by Jacob Parker-Dalton

Is it me, or is it getting a bit hot in here? Perhaps it’s something do with the recent announcement of an anime adaptation of Atsushi Ohkubo’s Fire Force manga, which has left me a little more than hot under the collar in anticipation.

Launched in 2015 not long after Ohkubo’s long-running and incredibly popular series Soul Eater came to end, Fire Force takes place in alternate Tokyo which is terrorized by “Infernals” - fire-based destructive beings that threaten the very existence of the human race. To counter this threat, special firefighting squadrons comprised of people with special abilities are formed, and it is into one such squadron that our protagonist, Shinra Kusakabe, enters with the intention of helping people as well as solving the mystery behind his family’s death in a fire some years ago.

Despite the changes that Ohkubo has had to endure as a creator - not only a stark departure in subject matter from Soul Eater but also changing magazine from Monthly Gangan to Weekly Shonen Magazine - these have not had an adverse effect on the series. Rather, it has continued to entertain since it’s inception, both due to the author’s own creativity as well as his decision to slowly open up the story and it’s world over time. It’s also been a solid success for Magazine, in which the series shares pages with such heavy hitters as Hajime no Ippo and The Seven Deadly Sins.

With that in mind, it’s very exciting for me to be able to say that after nearly three years of publication - which is a pretty long time considering Ohkubo’s previous successes - the manga has finally been picked up for an anime adaptation. And helming the project will be none other than the now legendary David Productions, who aside from being almost single-handedly responsible for the recent Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure boom, have also seen considerable success with their recent adaptation of Cells at Work.

Given David Productions’ incredible track record, I have no doubt that the Fire Force adaptation will be a very good adaptation, if not even better than the original manga - after all, there’s plenty of things for the talented staffers at David Productions to work with, from the inventive character designs to the multitude of fire-based abilities that can only benefit from full animation. They’ve also demonstrated in recent times that they’re not afraid to change elements of the original for the sake of a good adaptation - something that far too many studios are far too afraid of doing.

As a result, even though details on the adaptation are very scarce - with no staff or even a release date being shared - I can’t help but be incredibly stoked for what should be an excellent adaptation of a great manga. If you’d like to check out the manga in the meantime, then Kodansha Comics are translating the volumes into English, here.

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Fans Stranded in Saitama After ‘iDOLM@STER’ Concert

November 15, 2018 3:00pm
by Jacob Parker-Dalton

When you’ve just spent four hours sweating buckets at a concert, just about the only thing you want to do is have a bath and go to sleep - not get stranded in the middle of nowhere. But that’s exactly what happened to many fans of the iDOLM@STER series who went to one of the franchise’s concerts last weekend.

Saitama prefecture’s MetLife Dome played host to the sixth annual iDOLM@STER Cinderella Girls (or Deremas) concert, and while this may have been one of the biggest venues for the franchise yet - with an overall capacity of around 36,000 people - it certainly seems as though the public transport system was not prepared at all for the mass of people that were to descend upon it.

That being said, arrival at the venue went very smoothly for fans, as people tend to arrive at different times depending on if they want to purchase goods before the live or not, but it was after the live that true chaos descended on the station, as the whole stadium poured out at the same time towards Seibu Kyujou-mae station, all tired and all wanting to head home after a fun, yet no doubt exhausting live event.

The sheer mass of people quickly overwhelmed the station, and far from the crowd thinning once the trains started departing, it only grew - leading to some truly “hellish” scenes being posted on social media.



It’s unclear what the problem was, as the station staff had clearly done what preparation they could beforehand, having put out fences to funnel the crowd towards the entrance gates, but the sheer mass of people quickly shut down the entire station. This also lead to two of the lines that pass through the station, the Seibu Yamaguchi and Sayama lines, to have to cease operations entirely, which led to trains further back along the line to be delayed considerably. According to some fans who were waiting towards the back of crowd, it took nearly an hour and a half for them to get home from the end of the live - and that’s to say nothing of those who were further along the line than them who simply wanted to get home from work on that Friday night!

Regardless of why this abject failure on the Seibu railway company’s part happened, it’s clear that the organizing staff for iDOLM@STER concerts, and concert staff, in general, will have to seriously consider whether or not to use the MetLife Dome again for their events. It’s simply something that shouldn’t be happening, especially when downtown Tokyo can function so well despite far more people being concentrated in the stations during rush hour. As one Twitter user put it, “iM@S may be the best, but Seibu Kyujou-mae is the worst!”.

Source: Matomame

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Daichi Miura’s Theme Song for 'Dragon Ball Super: Broly' Embraces Hypebeast Goku

November 15, 2018 2:00pm
by Lachlan Johnston

With the theatrical release of Dragon Ball Super: Broly drawing near, we're starting to see more and more content from the film revealed to drum up hype -- one of which includes the release of Daichi Miura's theme song for the film, "Blizzard". If you haven't had a chance to check out the theme song, I'd definitely recommend it. Despite its ice-cold name, the track is a total heater, and I'm sure the sequences in which it appears during the film will be equally intense. But that's not the most important part of the track; instead, I'm going to direct your attention to Super Saiyan Blue Goku on the cover.


 


Released as one of two alternative covers for the single release of "Blizzard", Goku's looking fresh in his 19 A/W blizzard fit from hair to toe. Honestly, it looks like the sort of cover I'd expect to see anywhere but an official Dragon Ball release, but I'm completely for it -- especially if we get some new streetwear pieces out of it too. On the flip-side, we see vocalist Daichi Miura rocking a similar fit for the standard digital edition of the single release.

With the street fashion industry pulling numerous cues from both anime and manga over recent years, it's exciting to see a reverse inception of such styles. Screening in theaters across Japan as of this week, and set to begin screening in North America from January 16, 2019, Dragon Ball Super: Broly is shaping up to be on a whole other level, and I can't wait to check it out. Those interested in checking out even more on the upcoming film, be sure to take a look at its official website.

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[Review] Everything Falls Into Place in Tetris Effect

November 15, 2018 1:00pm
by Matt Mirkovich

At the intersection of music and video games, there are two names that immediately come to my mind. The first is Naoki Maeda, credited with birthing arcade games like Beatmania and Dance Dance Revolution, Maeda and his team successfully married the gameplay elements to the music, making addicting arcade games that you still see regularly played in Japan and America a full twenty years after their inception. The second, is Tetsuya Mizuguchi, the creator of games like Rez, its successor, Child of Eden, Lumines, and Meteos, who wove the visual elements together with the music in an attempt to convey the sense of Synesthesia, a phenomenon that people describe as being able to ‘see’ music.

His first attempt at that, Rez, was a cult title from the Dreamcast era, and ever since its release I have followed each and every title that Mizuguchi has worked on, from Every Extra Extend to Ninety-Nine Nights, and I thought that the Lumines games released on the PSP would be the end all be all of Tetris rivals. But what happens when Mizuguchi gets to put his hands directly on Tetris? Well, you get Tetris Effect.
 

I don’t think I really need to explain Tetris, but let’s just get this out of the way. It’s the same gameplay it has always been, blocks are falling, create lines of blocks to eliminate them from the field, and if they reach the top, it’s game over. Okay, that’s done. But what is it that makes this version so special? The original is still a classic and is regularly played at a competitive level amongst seasoned pros, along with all variations of Tetris: The Grand Master. Tetris is a game that has endured. But it is with the touch of Mizuguchi, bringing the element of Synesthesia blending the visual and audio elements to create an experience that is very much different from anything that came before it, but still maintains that intense satisfaction that one can experience by playing Tetris.

If there’s a ‘preferred’ way to experience Tetris Effect, I would have to recommend it be played with a PSVR headset, if only for the immersion factor alone. Tetris Effect is a beautiful game from both a visual and audio perspective, and as a fan of Rez VR, I knew what I was getting in to; but at the same time, I still wasn't prepared for what I was about the see and hear. Even from the initial trailer for Tetris Effect, I knew this was going to be something special, and across the game’s ‘Journey’ and ‘Effect’ modes, the experience is nothing short of phenomenal. Even without the immersion of VR, the teams at Monstars and Resonair have outdone themselves. But let’s get into the how and why.

The ‘Journey’ mode is the base game for Tetris Effect -- spread across 27 different stages, broken up into three to five song blocks, each grouping boasts a wide variety of visuals and sounds. The first course starts with what could be considered the game’s theme song, ‘Connected,’ an uplifting pop song with undersea visuals set to the backdrop of the earth, and after clearing the requisite number of lines, the song in the block comes up, ‘Pharaoh’s Code,’ with its own set of unique visuals and sounds, and this continues through to the final stage, ‘Metamorphosis.’ The gameplay for Journey mode is best described as Tetris meets Lumines. One thing Lumines loved to do was alter the speed of the blocks to keep gamers on their toes, and they’ve brought that over to Tetris Effect with what I consider to be a pretty good success. It keeps things interesting and doesn’t just smother the player in faster and faster speeds like a normal round of Tetris would. If I’m looking for that classic flavor of Tetris gameplay, then it’s over to the ‘Effect’ modes.

In Effect mode, players can find a number of different game modes, like Infection, that requires players to clear the ‘infected’ blocks in order to keep things from spreading out of control, or the classic Marathon mode, where 150 lines need to be cleared as quickly as possible. Effect mode also features weekly community events that allow players to contribute to a weekly goal by playing the requisite modes, participating in these events will unlock new avatars that can be used to represent your player on the global leaderboards. In addition to this there is a personal leveling system, and clearing different stages will award experience points toward your level, and while there is the chance for duplicate avatars to get picked up, those duplicates result in bonus experience, which is a nice addition, since it’s very likely that some of these avatars are going to be ‘rare.’
 

So, to say Mizuguchi has some experience with combining visual and music elements to great effect is something of an understatement, and this is especially true with Tetris Effect. Every stage in this game has visuals to match the audio component, and they intersect in interesting ways. Playing the stage, ‘Da Vinci,’ players are sent flying through the air with the tetrominoes displayed as gears that turn with each line clear, and the sounds of tetrominoes falling compliments the music track. Each level does this to varying levels of success, and to say there is a ‘bad’ track in the bunch is nearly impossible. The different styles may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but there is certain to be one track out there at the very least every person can latch on to. The discordant piano of Downtown Jazz, or the EDM festival sound of Celebration, the work put down by composer Noboru Mutoh, and the Hydelic group is a master class in video game soundtracks that to me, only compares with Keiichi Okabe’s NieR: Automata soundtrack in terms of ‘near-perfection.’

The VR functionality of Tetris Effect is what really separates this game from its peers and elevates it to ‘Game of the Year’ contention. When you combine the immersion of playing Tetris with the visual and auditory elements, it left me in a state of something short of ecstacy. And to try to describe that feeling is complicated. I feel like this effect is going to vary from person to person, but for me, it’s about a sense of control. To play Tetris Effect is to take control of a very chaotic situation, and when I’m clicking, and the game is going my way, the game responds in kind with explosions of color and sound. It’s incredibly easy for me to find a rhythm while playing this game, I’m tapping my foot, I’m bobbing my head, the tetrominoes are falling in time with the music. It all melts together into this sensation that is both calming and euphoric, which is something I haven’t experienced since, maybe the first Lumines game.

The medical term ‘Tetris Effect’ is described as the result of intense focus and repetition, as studied with the use of the game Tetris, people who played the game could remember seeing the tetrominoes, even after playing the game, out of the corner of their eyes, or as part of their dreams. Playing Tetris Effect is like experiencing one of those dreams, as Mizuguchi and his teams at Monstars and Resonair have woven music and impressive visuals wrapped in the Unreal Engine into one of the most visually arresting games released in this current generation of hardware. It’s not enough that I tell you that you need to play Tetris Effect, you need to experience it -- there really is nothing else like it.

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'Alita: Battle Angel' Live-Action Movie Receives New Trailer

November 15, 2018 12:00pm
by Lachlan Johnston

If the neon-tinged stylings of the upcoming ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL live-action Hollywood adaptation are your kind of thing, then you're in luck, with an all-new trailer for the film releasing earlier this week. Scheduled to hit theaters across North America on February 14, 2019, the upcoming film adapts Yukito Kishiro's 1990 manga series Battle Angel Alita and brings its cyberpunk setting and dystopian world to life in a blend of live-action and CG content that's sure to be a spectacle. 
 


Focusing on the fast-paced sport of the future, Motorball, the latest trailer highlights Alita's struggles with her past, as well as the threat it presents to her present. The film looks visually incredible, with director Robert Rodriguez seemingly doing an excellent job of representing the source material onscreen. The film is described by 20th Century Fox below:

From visionary filmmakers James Cameron (AVATAR) and Robert Rodriguez (SIN CITY), comes ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL, an epic adventure of hope and empowerment. When Alita (Rosa Salazar) awakens with no memory of who she is in a future world she does not recognize, she is taken in by Ido (Christoph Waltz), a compassionate doctor who realizes that somewhere in this abandoned cyborg shell is the heart and soul of a young woman with an extraordinary past. As Alita learns to navigate her new life and the treacherous streets of Iron City, Ido tries to shield her from her mysterious history while her street-smart new friend Hugo (Keean Johnson) offers instead to help trigger her memories. But it is only when the deadly and corrupt forces that run the city come after Alita that she discovers a clue to her past – she has unique fighting abilities that those in power will stop at nothing to control. If she can stay out of their grasp, she could be the key to saving her friends, her family and the world she’s grown to love.

Set to release in theaters across North America on February 14, 2019, this might just be the film to keep an eye on at the beginning of next year. Those interested in checking out even more information on the film, including staff listings and theaters, be sure to check out the film's official website.

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‘Evangelion Pub’ Set to Serve Themed Food and Drinks in Ikebukuro

November 14, 2018 5:00pm
by Jacob Parker-Dalton

With Neon Genesis Evangelion being such an integral part of modern Japanese culture (at least in the pop culture sense), perhaps it was only a matter of time before it was combined with another age-old Japanese tradition - that of the ‘izakaya.’

Loosely translating to ‘pub,’ izakaya are a mainstay in Japanese nightlife as not only do they serve alcoholic drinks at very reasonable prices but also a wide array of special food designed especially to accompany a cool beer or highball. So you can bet we were excited to hear that the legendary Evangelion series will be opening an izakaya of its own - but not without a distinctly Evangelion flavor, of course.

Set to open November 16 in Ikebukuro, the ‘Evangelion Pub’ will be serving up more than 30 different Evangelion-themed food and drink items for fans of the series to enjoy. The menu will draw inspiration from scenes and famous lines from the series for its offerings, such as the “I Mustn't Run Away! Super Spicy Mapo Tofu Bowl” and the “Anta Bataaa? Asuka’s Corn Butter” dish. 


Furthermore, the various drinks on offer - many of which are themed after the Evangelion units themselves - are all only 390 yen, which makes the pub very competitive with the cheap prices of other, regular izakayas. What’s more is that ordering a drink will enter you into a prize draw, from which you can receive a special calendar for the year ahead.

And speaking of the year ahead, this year is a rather special one as it will mark the last year of the ‘Heisei’ era, with Japan’s current Emperor abdicating at the end of the year, thus bringing in a new, as of yet unnamed era presided over by his son, Naruhito. To ring in the end of this historic period, the pub will also be hosting an event with none other than Yoko Takahashi on December 26, who lent her voice to the series’ original opening song, A Cruel Angel’s Thesis. 

Other events are set to be announced (including a ‘rock-paper-scissors grand tournament’) so keep your eye on the official Evangelion website for more details, here. The full menu for the pub can also be found here. You’ll have until January 6, 2019, to check it out.

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